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Archive for the ‘Monolithic Tempered’ Category

Daylighting interior spaces for LEED credits

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Whether illuminating an office building, arts center, or educational facility, a fine method of control is needed to keep light levels balanced throughout the day and through different weather conditions.  This can include a lighting system, sunshades, window shades, and interior windows. 

The first essential step in daylighting is to design a building with maximum access to natural light through the use of open-air design, incorporating atriums, skylights, and windows to draw sunlight into workplaces. The second is to balance artificial light with sunlight to create optimal mood and functionality in the space.

When it comes to glass partitions, Eureka can help find the optimum solution for your needs!

Standard Monolithic Tempered Glazing

  Butt Glazed PartitionPhoto represents clear tempered glass partition installed by Eureka at Knoll showroom This is one of the most common applications.  Glass can be set in top and bottom aluminum channels, with either open air or siliconed vertical butt joints.  Depending on the size of the opening, different thicknesses of glass are recommended to minimize deflection. 

Sandblasted or Filmed Glazing

  Glass Partition with Stripes of FilmPhoto represents clear tempered glass partition and entrance with film stripes  installed by Eureka at a Center City office This application is also among the most common applications.  Glass can be sandblasted or filmed with clear borders, patterns, logos, and text.  Clients can provide their own graphic files for sandblasting or filming.  When specifying, be sure to provide any special requirements including which face of glass receives film, what type of film is to be applied, font and size of any text or graphics.

Decorative Glazing

  Nathan Allan Glass Wall

Fry Reglet Graph SystemPhotos represent specialty glass partitions installed by Eureka at Commerce Bank University

Whether it’s cast glass, or an acrylic resin panel, the aethetic options are limitless!  Decorative glazing can also be set in standard channels or frames, as well as with cable and standoff systems.  Among some of the manufacturer’s Eureka has worked with over the years are:

  • 3-Form
  • Architectural Glass Art
  • Bendheim
  • Fry Reglet
  • Goldray
  • Livinglass
  • Nathan Allan
  • Skyline Design

Glass Stand Off

Recent trends also include:

Vision-60 (Fire-rated) System™

  Vision 60 Fire-rated Glazing SystemPhoto compliments of Interedge Technologies Imagine an entire fire rated wall free of vertical frames, where each glass panel is butt against the next. Truly free and open vision is now possible for your fire rated projects! Introducing the first U.S. 60-minute, fire-rated, butt-glazed transparent wall-the Vision-60 System™. This system offers you what you have wanted for years-the ability to have a rated, continuously glazed transparent wall, uninterrupted by intermediate framing-without compromising the beauty and elegance of your vision. Learn more about this product on its web page.

Translucent Linear Channel Glass System
      from Technical Glass Products/Pilkington

  Translucent Linear Channel Glass SystemPhoto compliments of Technical Glass Products The Pilkington Profilit™ translucent linear channel glass system consists of unique, self-supporting cast glass channels and an extruded metal perimeter frame. The end result is a wall that obscures vision but allows light to pass through. Pilkington Profilit can be used in interior or exterior applications. The “U-shaped” channels can be installed either vertically or horizontally.  Learn more about this system on its web page.

Written by Anson

May 10, 2010 at 12:53 pm

Tempered Laminated Glass- What are the Advantages?

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Both tempered glass and laminated glass are considered to be types of “safety” glass.  Did you know that architects and designers are moving towards products combining these two types of glass to provide added security?  The following is an excerpt from an article by Dr. Gérard Savineau, Technical, Solutia Europe/Africa S.A./N.V.

The tempered laminated glass market has been growing fast in the last decade, mainly in high-rise buildings. The question arises: why use tempered laminated glass? The answer is straightforward: for safety reasons and potential liability issues. Other types of glasses such as annealed float glass and heat-strengthened glass are not accepted by the building codes as “safety glass”. Tempered glass is a safety glass but it may break spontaneously. Application of the heat soaked treatment (HST) may strongly reduce this risk but does not eliminate it fully. This raises the critical question of the post breakage behavior of so-called “safety glass”.

Read the full article, “Trends and Challenges of Tempered Laminated Glass” here.

Library Article

Trends and Challenges of Tempered Laminated Glass

Dr. Gérard Savineau, Technical, Solutia Europe/Africa S.A./N.V.

The tempered laminated glass market has been growing fast in the last decade, mainly in high-rise buildings. The question arises: why use tempered laminated glass? The answer is straightforward: for safety reasons and potential liability issues. Other types of glasses such as annealed float glass and heat-strengthened glass are not accepted by the building codes as “safety glass”. Tempered glass is a safety glass but it may break spontaneously. Application of the heat soaked treatment (HST) may strongly reduce this risk but does not eliminate it fully. This raises the critical question of the post breakage behavior of so-called “safety glass”.

Written by Anson

March 29, 2010 at 3:00 pm

Annealed, Tempered, or Laminated Glass?

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Tempered glass and annealed glass are different in composition and applications. Tempered glass is the more popular but there are many uses for simple annealed glass. Tempered glass is valued for its safety and strength, but when neither of those factors is an issue, annealed glass is a good, less expensive choice.

When tempered glass is shattered it breaks into round pieces that pose no risk. When annealed glass (commonly refered to as double or triple strength) is shattered it breaks into sharp jagged pieces able to inflict serious injury or death. As noted above building codes require the use of tempered glass in certain installations depending on the risk of breakage.

As a general rule of thumb, glass less than 24 inches from the ground or floor should be tempered, as well as any glass within a door or its adjacent sidelites.

Read more about the history and differences between tempered and annealed glass at:  e-how.com

Check out this handy guide to distinguish Annealed, Tempered, or Laminated Glass?

Written by Anson

March 15, 2010 at 2:00 pm

How is Tempered Glass Made?

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Compliments of Scientific American & GANA
Tempered glass is about four times stronger than “ordinary,” or annealed, glass. And unlike annealed glass, which can shatter into jagged shards when broken, tempered glass fractures into small, relatively harmless pieces. As a result, tempered glass is used in those environments where human safety is an issue. Applications include side and rear windows in vehicles, entrance doors, shower and tub enclosures, racquetball courts, patio furniture, microwave ovens and skylights.

Watch the glass manufacturing process at the Glass Association of North America’s website.

Properties of Tempered Glass

Tempered glass is thermally (heat) treated glass created to break into small, uniform fragments. Glass that has not been tempered has a tendency to travel when breaking, its shards taking on a weapon like shape. Sharp jagged edges are missing from tempered glass and so is the possibility of sure injury. Tempered glass has been made stronger through a heating process, and has to some extent become heat resistant so it does not shatter as easily when exposed to fire or pressure. Cracks in untempered glass are started by a defect, a point of weakness, that began in the making of the glass. Due to the compression and heating of tempered glass it is much more difficult to shatter and therefore the safer alternative in many situations.

Annealing The Glass

Tempered glass begins its transition as annealed glass. Annealing can be performed on glass even if it does not go on to become tempered glass. In fact, most glass has been annealed. Stress points are created during the making of glass and as a result glass responds easily to the slightest pressure and temperature changes by shattering. The annealing process strengthens the glass and prevents its easy destruction. The annealing process lowers the temperature of the glass slowly and by doing so relieves the stress points by relaxing them and making them disappear. There are two important points in the annealing process; the strain point and the annealing point. The annealing point comes first in the heating process. This is the point where the stresses relax. Heat soaking at this point allows the glass to take on an even temperature until the predetermined strain point is reached. Any stress left in the glass by the time it is heated to its strain point will always be there. The annealing process and its strain point is defined by the thickness and the type of glass being heated.

Tempering With Heat

Once the glass is annealed it can be cut and sized. It is then placed on a conveyor belt that rolls through a tempering oven or furnace. It is once again heated to the annealing temperature and slightly over it. This means the interior glass is not quite solid and it is at this point in the process that the exterior glass is forced to cool very quickly. This is achieved through blasting the glass with high pressured, cool air while it is just over the annealing temperature. This application of hot and cold temperatures is a controlled process. Untempered glass in a building fire is experiencing a tempering of sorts but it is dramatic and destructive as opposed to directed and controlled. In the tempering process, the outer glass tries to pull away from its edges setting up compression but the inner glass, which is hot, remains tense. This tension and compression is the strength of tempering.

Tempering With Chemicals

A chemical application to the annealed glass can set up a similar reaction. Placed in a bath of melted potassium nitrate, the glass is coated and the chemical creates compression by the exchange of ions on the surface of the glass. This process creates an even tougher tempered glass but is expensive compared to using a tempering oven. Chemical treatments are usually used on shaped glass whose surfaces do not temper evenly. The chemical process can be applied all over the shape and not change it. Heating a shape in a furnace will alter the object and produce an uneven tempering.

Tempered glass is about four times stronger than “ordinary,” or annealed, glass. And unlike annealed glass, which can shatter into jagged shards when broken, tempered glass fractures into small, relatively harmless pieces. As a result, tempered glass is used in those environments where human safety is an issue. Applications include side and rear windows in vehicles, entrance doors, shower and tub enclosures, racquetball courts, patio furniture, microwave ovens and skylights.

Watch the glass manufacturing process at the Glass Association of North America’s website.

Properties of Tempered Glass

Tempered glass is thermally (heat) treated glass created to break into small, uniform fragments. Glass that has not been tempered has a tendency to travel when breaking, its shards taking on a weapon like shape. Sharp jagged edges are missing from tempered glass and so is the possibility of sure injury. Tempered glass has been made stronger through a heating process, and has to some extent become heat resistant so it does not shatter as easily when exposed to fire or pressure. Cracks in untempered glass are started by a defect, a point of weakness, that began in the making of the glass. Due to the compression and heating of tempered glass it is much more difficult to shatter and therefore the safer alternative in many situations.

Annealing The Glass

Tempered glass begins its transition as annealed glass. Annealing can be performed on glass even if it does not go on to become tempered glass. In fact, most glass has been annealed. Stress points are created during the making of glass and as a result glass responds easily to the slightest pressure and temperature changes by shattering. The annealing process strengthens the glass and prevents its easy destruction. The annealing process lowers the temperature of the glass slowly and by doing so relieves the stress points by relaxing them and making them disappear. There are two important points in the annealing process; the strain point and the annealing point. The annealing point comes first in the heating process. This is the point where the stresses relax. Heat soaking at this point allows the glass to take on an even temperature until the predetermined strain point is reached. Any stress left in the glass by the time it is heated to its strain point will always be there. The annealing process and its strain point is defined by the thickness and the type of glass being heated.

Tempering With Heat

Once the glass is annealed it can be cut and sized. It is then placed on a conveyor belt that rolls through a tempering oven or furnace. It is once again heated to the annealing temperature and slightly over it. This means the interior glass is not quite solid and it is at this point in the process that the exterior glass is forced to cool very quickly. This is achieved through blasting the glass with high pressured, cool air while it is just over the annealing temperature. This application of hot and cold temperatures is a controlled process. Untempered glass in a building fire is experiencing a tempering of sorts but it is dramatic and destructive as opposed to directed and controlled. In the tempering process, the outer glass tries to pull away from its edges setting up compression but the inner glass, which is hot, remains tense. This tension and compression is the strength of tempering.

Tempering With Chemicals

A chemical application to the annealed glass can set up a similar reaction. Placed in a bath of melted potassium nitrate, the glass is coated and the chemical creates compression by the exchange of ions on the surface of the glass. This process creates an even tougher tempered glass but is expensive compared to using a tempering oven. Chemical treatments are usually used on shaped glass whose surfaces do not temper evenly. The chemical process can be applied all over the shape and not change it. Heating a shape in a furnace will alter the object and produce an uneven tempering.

Written by eurekaglass

July 17, 2009 at 2:50 pm